Ford 7.3L 98-99 Injector Swapout Steps

First ratcheting socket wrench, made by J.J. R...

First ratcheting socket wrench, made by J.J. Richardson, 1863. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ford 7.3L 98-99 Injector Swapout Steps

The first part of an injector swapout requires the removal of the valve cover. Once the chassis is opened, then the repair requires the removal of the CAC tube as well as the various control module and sensors to get the valve cover free of the assembly. Note that some of the securing bolts can be a bit stubborn due to the evaporator casing being right nearby.

With the first step completed, the standpipe then needs to be removed. With the pipe out of the way, the oil rail can then be addressed. The oil rails can be loosened and drained into the cylinder head to catch the oil in them. A socket wrench can then be used to unlock the injector connector locking taps. This allows the injector connector to be moved.

The injector hold down clamp bolt then needs to be removed. Once loosened, the injector itself will float out of its bore. This allows the mechanic to examine the injector’s o-rings and copper seals for damage.

A new injector can be inserted with new oil, reversing the steps by using the clamp to keep the new injector in place. With a new connector o-ring lubricated, it too can be inserted. More oil should be added as the oil rail is put back into place. The covers and sensors can then be installed back on and closed up.

Once complete, expect starting the engine to take a bit. The assembly has to push out all the air that it got exposed to and re-assert a vacuum again. Once the air purges, then the new diesel injectors will work and flow accordingly. A bit of exhaust smoke can be expected in the first two dozen miles.

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